Three things that are probably true at least some of the time:
  1. Online curation began as a marketing technique. It’s a way to build a brand and a relationship with customers/ audiences without trying to directly sell them anything.
  2. Internal learning and development teams are not very good at marketing what they do or what learning opportunities are available.
  3. Despite what you read on Twitter, a lot of learners are not learners they’re just people you work with. They don’t really care much about learning.

So instead of thinking of curation tools like scoop.it or Pearl Trees as learning tools, start thinking about them as marketing tools. Use them in the same way as a marketer does. If we start thinking about them in this way, it follows or perhaps leads, that it should be part of your marketing mix. You may think you don’t have a marketing mix, but you do.

You send emails to people telling them about development opportunities, you write content for your intranet to advertise what you and your team can do for the business. You may put posters up around your offices or factories . Hello! You are marketing learning, but if you haven’t recognised this already, you could probably find a few ways to improve how you do it.

We need to think about this side of our activities as seriously as learning analysis or design.

How do we do this? Learn from marketing. Find out what your audience care about, figure out how learning can help them with that then tell them about it using a variety of media. If you are marketing internally you are dealing with a range of demographics so you need to find the common interests that unite the group or you need to target different groups with different messages.

I work in an internal Learning and Development team so I’m certainly not the best person to give advice on marketing. What else should we be doing?

Why not join us in Bath next week and share your ideas and experience? Find out more

Post by: Sam Burrough (39 Posts)